Funny Obituaries That Show It’s OK to Laugh

Obituaries are typically serious. This makes sense because they’re meant to tell the story of a person’s life in the wake of that person’s passing. There’s a certain gravity inherent in that, so a straightforward, serious obituary is perfectly reasonable. However, if your loved one enjoyed humor and would have approved of you lightening the mood, you might consider having some fun with the obituary.  

Consider these real-life examples of humorous obituaries: 

  • William “Freddie” McCullough, of Bloomingdale, Georgia: “The man. The myth. The legend. Men wanted to be him and women wanted to be with him. William Freddie McCullough died on September 11, 2013. Freddie loved deep fried Southern food smothered in Cane Syrup, fishing at Santee Cooper Lake, Little Debbie Cakes, Two and a Half Men, beautiful women, Reese’s Cups and Jim Beam. Not necessarily in that order. He hated vegetables and hypocrites. Not necessarily in that order.” You can read the full obituary here, which includes references to his exploits, television heroes, and truth-telling capacity. For those who would just like to know how Freddie’s story ended: “Freddie was killed when he rushed into a burning orphanage to save a group of adorable children. Or maybe not. We all know how he liked to tell stories.” 
  • Nevena Ann Topic, of Newburyport, Massachusetts: “Ann would like to let you know that her work here is done. She received a call, a sort of an offer you can’t refuse, for an appointment from which she will not be returning. This assignment comes with a huge sign-on bonus, a reunion with family and friends she has not seen in a long time. Job security is exactly 110 percent. Her new mission takes her to a wonderful place where she will be socializing, dancing, gardening and reading to her heart’s content. Music, laughter and love are guaranteed. Food is delicious, and you never gain an ounce. She left detailed instructions for her husband and children to celebrate her mission here, which has now been completed. Low adherence to this instruction will not be tolerated. We want to let her know that she did a great job and wish her a safe journey. We will remember her smile, her warmth, her energy, her love for life, family and friends, but also students, colleagues and clients, many of whom over time also became friends. She worked very hard all her life, up until the very end. She made a difference in the lives of many. We invite you to join us and celebrate together.” 
  • Harry Weathersby Stamps, of Long Beach, Mississippi: “Harry took fashion cues from no one. His signature every day look was all his: a plain pocketed T-shirt designed by the fashion house Fruit of the Loom, his black-label elastic waist shorts worn above the navel and sold exclusively at the Sam’s on Highway 49, and a pair of old school Wallabees (who can even remember where he got those?) that were always paired with a grass-stained MSU baseball cap.” This obituary was so well-received locally that it ended up being featured in an article in the UK’s Daily Mail.  

If you’re responsible for writing a loved one’s obituary, you can decide how best to draft it to honor that person’s personality. Mountain View Funeral Home, Memorial Park & Crematory is happy to help you plan a funeral, and we’ll even help you decide how to write the obituary. You might also consider writing your own obituary, which can be found in our preplanning guide. Call us at (253) 948-9895 for more information or if you’d like help getting started.

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